It’s all about the recording

Neighbouring rights are so-called secondary exploitation rights related to the use of audio and audiovisual recordings.

Sources
of income

If recordings that you own or have contributed to are being publicly performed or broadcasted, you’re earning neighbouring rights royalties.

Broadcasting

Terrestrial radio, webradio services, TV

Public Performance

Bars, clubs, shopping malls

New Online Media

Webcasts, simulcasting

Private Copying Levy

Blank media levies for PCs, tablets, smartphones

Dubbing

Recorded music being copied commercially

Performing rights organizations

The derived neighbouring rights royalties are collected by local collecting societies, such as PPL (UK), SoundExchange (US), GVL (DE) or PPCA (AU), based on collective licensing.

p.r.o. agency

We ensure that your rights are duly registered, claimed and monitored, so you’ll really receive all of your income internationally.

Beneficial rights owners

Master Rights Owners

50%

The master rights owner of the recording, e.g. labels, artists, production companies

Performing Artists

50%

The artists contributing on the recording, e.g. musicians, creative producers, actors